Dare to Compose

*Spelunking into the mind for those gems of thought*

I'm an aspiring writer finding himself dazed and confused amongst this horrifying "real world" and barely scraping by in the attempt to keep writing. I'm scatterbrained with a consistent amount of dream dust in my eyes, so it may take a while before I say anything that makes sense.

http://www.buttonshut.com http://www.buttonshut.com http://www.buttonshut.com


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incidentalcomics:

Finding Purpose

Illustration for the 4/20 NY Times Sunday Review, for an op-ed on finding meaning at work. Thanks to AD Aviva Michaelov!

incidentalcomics:

Unexpected Rain Song
"April Rain Song" by Langston Hughes was one of my favorite poems from childhood. I’ve experienced the rain a bit differently as an adult. 

incidentalcomics:

Unexpected Rain Song

"April Rain Song" by Langston Hughes was one of my favorite poems from childhood. I’ve experienced the rain a bit differently as an adult. 

officialfrenchtoast:

Lesson learned from video games [x]

incidentalcomics:

Understanding Poetry

Happy National Poetry Month! This comic was inspired by one of my favorite poems, "The New Poetry Handbook" by Mark Strand. This month on Incidental Comics, I’ll be exploring the world of poetry. A place, as Marianne Moore famously said, of  ”imaginary gardens with real toads in them.”

If you’re going to try not just to depict the way a culture’s bound and defined by mediated gratification and image, but somehow to redeem it, or at least fight a rearguard against it, then what you’re going to be doing is paradoxical. You’re at once allowing the reader to sort of escape self by achieving some sort of identification with another human psyche — the writer’s, or some character’s, etc. — and you’re also trying to antagonize the reader’s intuition that she is a self, that she is alone and going to die alone. You’re trying somehow both to deny and affirm that the writer is over here with his agenda while the reader’s over there with her agenda, distinct. This paradox is what makes good fiction sort of magical, I think. The paradox can’t be resolved, but it can somehow be mediated — “re-mediated,” since this is probably where poststructuralism rears its head for me — by the fact that language and linguistic intercourse is, in and of itself, redeeming, remedying.
David Foster Wallce

Just finished this series :-)

incidentalcomics:

Styles of Writing

muttscomicsofficial:

"A little madness in the Spring is wholesome even for the King." - Emily Dickinson